How to Write Absolutely Addictive Articles

This is a longer article.

If youare feeling noncommittal at the moment, donat read it. Save it. Bookmark this page for later, when you have more time.

Youall be glad you did, especially if your goal is to write articles of your own. Articles that entice readers in slowly, carefully, inching them down the page, sentence by sentence, until the words run out. Articles people canat stop read.

Joe Sugarman wrote articles like this. In fact, he was behind some of the most addictive and profitable articles ever created. Except he called them aprint ads.a

Meet Joe.

In 1986, Joe Sugarman, a direct answer copywriter, wrote a print ad for BluBlocker Sunglasses. The ad helped an iconic brand take root. It also made him rich 😛 TAGEND

He distributed his ad the old-fashioned route, in the mail, asking readers to call in with their credit card. The reply was enormous. The glass sold out in a day. And he did this again and again with an assortment of products: calculators and speakers, smoke detectors and thermostats, even planes and mansions.

His success stemmed from his ability to keep people reading.

Sugarman knew that prospects who finished an ad were far more likely to buy the product than those who only read the start. So he used every engagement tactic he knew to keep people glued to the page, addicted.

How to Write Addictive Articles

Towards the end of his career, Sugarman started disclosing his copywriting secrets in expensive seminars. To communicate his vast knowledge, he organized it into axioms.

Some of his axioms are philosophical truths, intended to help business owners arrive at a unique selling slant 😛 TAGEND aNever sell a product or service. Always sell a concept.a aSelling a cure is a lot easier than selling a preventative.a aWhen trying to solve problems, donat presume constraints that arenat really there.a Brief: aIf you look at many of my ads, youall notice that all of my first sentences are so short they almost arenat sentences, a writes Sugarman. aNo long multisyllabic words, either. Maintain it short, sweet and almost incomplete so that the reader has to read the next sentence. aIf you look at many of my ads, youall notice that all of my first sentences are so short they almost arenat sentences, a writes Sugarman. aNo long multisyllabic terms, either. Keep it short, sweet and virtually incomplete so that the reader has to read the next sentence. Spoken: Dialogue connotes present action, which is compelling. Dialogue connotes present action, which is compelling. Coy, obliterate, or unsettling: If your first line depict a question, instigates curiosity, or sneaks out the reader, thereas a good chance he or she will move on to the next line. Use active voice because itas easy to read. because itas easy to read. Use white space because it commands the readeras attention. because it commands the readeras attention. Use contractions because they induce copy voice informal, light. since they are induce transcript sound informal, light. Use simple terms because nobody is impressed by your vocabulary. because nobody is impressed by your vocabulary. Use second person because you wishes to build the reader feel included. True: something accurate, like a fact. something accurate, like a fact. Interesting: something captivating, like a story. something captivating, like a narrative. Informative: something valuable, like instructions. aSo read on a | a aLet me explain a | a aBut thereas more a | a aBut I didnat stop there a | a aNow here comes the good component a | a Write your articleas headline. Based on the headline, anticipate and answer your Ideal Readeras questions. Headline: How to Write Addictive Articles Q1: aSounds up my alley, but do I really want to read this whole thing? a
A1: aMaybe not this minute, but you should at some point.a

Q2: aWhy? a
A2: aBecause itall teach you how to write articles like Joe Sugarman.a

Q3: aJoe who? a
A3: aHeas one of the best direct reaction copywriters ever.a

Q4: aOh yeh? What constructs him so good? a
A4: aWell, heas got these axioms a | a

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