How Customer-Driven Copy Helped HubSpot Increase Conversions by Virtually 100%

New copy isn’t better just because it’s new.

You can’t just give your copy a “refresh” or aimlessly fiddle with headlines to get a huge boost in conversions. These various kinds of false hopes( and complete lack of a process) are why so many conversion copywriting projects fail, and so many new sites perform worse than the old ones.

If you want to make sure your new copy reaches a conversion home run, keep reading.

Last October, I had the opportunity to collaborate with the team at HubSpot to rewrite their copy as part of their site’s redesign. It was a conversion copywriter’s dreaming come true!

In this post, I’ll share the exact process we used to fine-tune the messaging and nearly double the site’s conversion rate.

Diagnosing Issues and Setting Goals

The first step to improving your copy and conversion funnel is to learn what’s not working. To do this, Josh Garofalo( who also wrote copy for this project) and I turned to a few sources 😛 TAGEND

Internal Interviews

We grilled HubSpot’s product development, sales, and support staff to get their inside perspective.

The product team gave us a better view on the evolution of the HubSpot software into the Growth Stack, so we could write about the product as it is now instead of how it was in the past. The HubSpot Growth Stack consists of HubSpot’s marketing, sales, and CRM software. gave us a better view on the evolution of the HubSpot software into the Growth Stack, so we could write about the product as it is now instead of how it was in the past. The HubSpot Growth Stack consists of HubSpot’s marketing, sales, and CRM software. The sales team illuminated the issues to, objections and pain points most frequently mentioned by results on calls. They also shared their most successful ways of overcoming objections and answering questions — things we could simulated with the site’s copy. illuminated the issues to, objections and pain points most frequently mentioned by results on calls. They also shared their most successful ways of overcoming objections and answering questions — things we could simulated with the site’s copy. The support team shared the recurring questions and frustrations expressed by results. We pored over support chats logs, highlighting recurring questions that we could solve proactively on the new site Pain points: The challenges and frustrations they face The challenges and frustrations they face Nervousness: The obstacles and fears that keep them from buying The obstacles and fears that keep them from buying Desired outcomes: What success looks like for them What success looks like for them Priorities: Which pain points, features, and benefits are most important to them Customer Type Why? Active( 3 – 6 months or longer) This group purchased recently enough to describe their pain points and priorities, as well as some benefits they’d realized.
( Make sure that you’re surveying customers who have had enough time to evaluate your product and find success with it .) Leads Leads are deep in tune with their pain points and nervousness — perfect for learning frustrations with the existing website and the obstacles they’re facing. Dead Accounts This customer group can help us understand what went wrong and how we could mitigate those problems. Memorable Quote Type Theme Feature Notes Where& Who? I have hour for doubled the work now. I can create my blogs in a few hours, manage my calendar, investigate my data, and still have time to break for lunch.” Benefit Efficiency Content Planner Sticky. Well-said; perhaps revamp into headline:

+ “Grow like a team twice your size” G2 Crowd, Joe Shmoe

Copy and paste standout customer quotes into the first column.

Categorize the quote by pain phase, benefit, nervousnes or priority. If the quote applies to more than one, choose the most appropriate and list the others in the “Notes” section.

As topics emerge, add them in the third column. Don’t worry about filling this column on a first pass — themes usually surface during review.

If the quote pertains to a specific feature, add it to the “Feature” column. This will make it easier to sort later on, giving you a defraud sheet for every feature.

Use “Notes” for your own reference. Remind yourself why you like the quote or how you might use it. If it’s a quotation you might think about stealing copy from, tag it as “Sticky”.

List who said it and where. This will make sure you can go back to the source.

Qualifying questions
We asked respondents to describe their role( helping us segment) and how they used HubSpot. Any respondent who said they didn’t use HubSpot anymore was pushed to a different set of questions to help us learn why they quit.

We accomplished this “on-the-fly segmenting” by use Typeform’s Logic Jumps.
Preferences
We asked how they liked to learn about software — whether by watching videos, reading landing pages, calling support, chatting online or reading reviews. This helped us decide if things like video or live chats should be included to support the copy.
Early experiences
We asked respondents, “What was going on in your business when you sought out a answer like HubSpot? ” This gave us a goldmine of insight into their pain points, purchase triggers and desired outcomes.
Priorities
We had respondents rank the criteria that were most important to them when making a purchase decision( cost, ease of use, access to support, etc .).

We also had them rank the features most important to them. This gave us a roadmap for which features we needed to call out early and often in the new copy, and which features weren’t as important to mention.
Results
We finished up the survey by asking leads what they’d been able to achieve use HubSpot. This gave us insight into the outcomes people wanted, the wins they’d achieved, and what made them happiest about use HubSpot. Which specific features were brought up most often as difference makers( like pipeline management or email automation)
were brought up most often as difference makers( like pipeline management or email automation)
Which pain points were frequently mentioned, and how they were described( e.g. a need for more sales, more flexibility, hour savings, etc .)
were frequently mentioned, and how they were described( e.g. a need for more sales, more flexibility, hour savings, etc .)
How many responses mentioned specific benefits or outcomes( like saving money, making results or automating procedures) Pain Point Eliminated Benefits Top Quotes Notes 1) 2) Customers had no idea HubSpot had evolved into the Growth Stack — three different pieces of software that worked both separately and together.
Leads didn’t understand which tools they needed to solve their problem or what they were signing up for. Accuracy Control
All pages of copy were operated past team members who worked directly on those products. You should do the same. All pages of copy were operated past team members who worked directly on those products. You should do the same. Voice/ Tone
Every draft was operated past HubSpot’s team to make sure the copy stuck to HubSpot’s style guidelines and spoke with a unified voice.

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