6 Interview Questions to Assess Emotional Intelligence

Despite what you might have come to believe after sorting through the internet’s apparently bottomless slew of articles on the subject, emotional intelligence is more than just a buzzword.

The ability to empathize with others, construct lasting relationships, and manage feelings in a healthy route has been proven time and time again to be one of the biggest indicators of workplace and interpersonal success.

Emotionally intelligent individuals can more easily adapt to new environments and relate to new colleagues and clients — crucial skills for anyone working at a marketing bureau. People with low levels of emotional intelligence might have difficulty managing relationships and dealing with stress, which could lead to burnout or bigger conflicts down the line.

Among employees who fail to meet expectations during their first 18 months on the job, 23% fail due to low emotional intelligence. That’s the second most prevalent reason new hires fail, following only general lack of coachability.

We know gauging a candidate’s emotional intelligence is pivotal when it comes to hiring the best new talent — but can something so complex be sufficiently evaluated in a brief interview setting?

Some nominees have mastered the capacities of seeming emotionally intelligent — answering instantaneously with practised, too-good-to-be-true responses to classic interview questions, e.g .:

What’s your greatest weakness?
Well, I simply care too darn much about my work.

To help you sift through the rehearsed responses and excavate deeper into a candidate’s real level of emotional intelligence, we’ve put together the following list of interview questions. Learn what to ask below and how to identify an emotionally intelligent response.

6 Interview Questions to Assess Emotional Intelligence

1) Can you tell me about a period you tried to do something and failed?

Asking a candidate to explain a failed project is not only a great way to see how they cope when things don’t go as schemed, it’s also an opportunity to see whether or not they’re comfortable taking full responsibility for their actions.

Look for a candidate who can straightforwardly describe a recent failure without shirking the bulk of the blame on other parties or unfortunate situations. Even if some external factors played a hand in the mishap, you want a candidate who is comfortable being held fully accountable, and can discuss even the nitty-gritty details of a failed project with fair-minded focus.

Does the candidate seem like they were able to fully bounce back from the issue without getting defensive? Emotionally intelligent someones possess an inherent self-confidence that can buoy them through setbacks and lets them assess troubling situations objectively, without harsh self-judgment or resorting to outward frustration.

Be wary of candidates who fixate too much on who or what they blame for the failure. When research projects doesn’t work up, the key takeaway shouldn’t be based on blamed. Emotionally intelligent people know how to move on and examine a situation without bitterness or bitternes clouding their judgment.

2) Tell me about a period you received negative feedback from your boss. How did that construct “youre feeling”?

One of the most easily recognizable qualities of an emotionally intelligent person is their ability to deal with criticism. People with high emotional intelligence are well-equipped to handle negative feedback without losing stride. They can process even unexpected feedback without letting it injury their self-worth.

That’s not to say negative feedback has no emotional impact on emotionally intelligent employees. People with high emotional intelligence experience feelings like everybody else — they just know how to fully process those feelings with a level head and a clear focus on the facts.

Look for a candidate who can specifically describe the feelings they experienced upon receiving negative feedback, e.g .: “At first I was astounded and a little frustrated by my manager’s comments on the project, but when I seemed deeper into the reasoning behind her remarks, I realized that I could have definitely devoted more attention to several key areas. On my next project, I was able to use her feedback to develop a more well-rounded approach.”

A response that acknowledges the specific emotions they experienced and depicts an empathic understanding of their manager’s point of view indicates a high level of emotional awareness.

Candidates who say they felt “bad” or can’t truly express why the feedback affected them might be less emotionally intelligent. Similarly, if a candidate supposes the feedback was wholly undeserved and doesn’t attempt to understand their manager’s point of view, they might have difficulty stepping outside of their own perspective.

3) Can you tell me about a conflict at work that induced “youre feeling” frustrated?

Everyone get frustrated sometimes. It’s how you handle that frustration that really matters.

Hearing how a candidate explains a work conflict can offer some valuable clues into their level of emotional intelligence. Conflicts can stir up a lot of difficult feelings, and asking a candidate to describe a dispute and how they dealt with it can give you meaningful insight into how they manage their feelings and empathize with others.

According to psychologist and author Daniel Goleman, emotionally intelligent people have four distinguishing characteristic 😛 TAGEND They were good at understanding their own emotions( self-awareness) They were good at managing their own emotions( self-management) They were empathetic to the emotional drives of other people( social awareness) They were good at handling other people’s feelings( social skills)

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